Elena Fucci ‘Titolo’ Aglianico del Vulture 2005

Aglianico and its most well known representation, Taurasi, has been called one of the great wines of Italy, as well as the catchy moniker ‘Barolo of the South,’ but despite the generally lavish praise it remains a relatively under-appreciated grape and wine. Hailing from Southern Italy, it is most commonly found in Campania and Basilicata. Campania’s ‘Taurasi’ is the most well known DOCG for Aglianico but Basilicata’s Vulture region is gaining traction, and for good reason.

Like Taurasi, Vulture is home to an incredibly diverse array of volcanic soil types, with vineyards at high elevations. Vulture however, because of its proximity to the sea (and exposure) tends to have even higher diurnal temperature variation than Taurasi, balancing out the effects of the unrelenting Southern Italian heat. That is why I believe in the best examples, Aglianico del Vulture beats out Taurasi for quality and ageability.

One of my favorites is Elena Fucci’s ‘Titolo.’ Elena Fucci makes only a single wine, 100% Aglianico, from old vine plantings in Vulture. In the late 90’s she convinced her family to let her making their own wine from the vineyards, which up to that point had been sold wholesale.

I’ve purchased more than a few bottles of Titolo over the past few years, but they were optimistic purchases as I had never tried a mature example. This particular bottle is soaring at 12 years old with another decade of reliable enjoyment ahead!

The color was a memorizing dark maroon with an opaque core. Aromas of dark berry fruits, grilled herbs, tar, and smoke gave a good indication of the terroir while a refreshing streak of saline reminded you of the maritime winds that cool this vineyard at night.

The palate is smooth, with a lush array of dark black and red fruits with ripe, persistent tannin emerging with air and a very nice savory finish. This wine is in a great place, though with air it picks up considerable tannin and a rich, dark dried fruit quality. After a few hours it was far more tannic and robust, with the aromatics continuing to shift.

I saved a glass for day two. It started to take on the qualities of a middle-aged Bordeaux, with aromas of tobacco and cedar. This wine will age evenly and for a good many years.

2012 Gattinara Franco Patriarca

It’s not news that Barolo and Barbaresco don’t have the monopoly on top quality Nebbiolo that they were once perceived to have, yet it still is tough to find new quality wineries from competition, like Ghemme, Carema, and of course Gattinara.

It’s not news that Barolo and Barbaresco don’t have the monopoly on top quality Nebbiolo that they were once perceived to have, yet it still is tough to find new quality wineries from the competition, like Ghemme, Carema, and of course Gattinara. This Alto-Piemonte poster child is only just north of the Abla and Asti communes, yet with a substantial difference of terroir, that is its volcanic soil. Despite the Alto-Piemonte climate, Gattinara’s volcanic grown Nebbiolo creates deep, aromatic, and mineral wines thanks to the distinctive soil. The region had an unfortunate 15 minutes of limelight back in the 60’s when someone tried to make it fashionable, but being pre-DOC regulations, a flood of cheap knockoffs and downright fraudulent wines flooded the market and ruined its image.

With DOCG regulations as strict as Barolo/Barbaresco and an equally important, though quite different soil composition, Gattinara can produce some pretty stunning Nebbiolo that can last decades. Yet few quality producers remain after the mid-century exodus from the farmlands. It is still only a shadow of the wine-making region it once was, and while Travaligni and Antoniolo still hold the torch, new wineries just aren’t popping up that often. So imagine my surprise at Kermit Lynch in Berkeley, when I find a reasonably Gattinara from Franco Patriarca sitting on the shelf.

With only 250 cases made, this is truly a locally oriented gem. Fermented in steel and age in only large barrels, this is a clean, transparent Nebbiolo.

 

The color is a deep crystalline rose with a pale garnet reflection. The aromas of rosewater and bay dominate the nose, as well as a somewhat unappealing watermelon candy quality. As time goes on, a more tarry, mineral tinged quality lifts from the glass that puts it a very good place. The clean unpretentious quality of this wine is honest and intriguing at the same time. RECOMMENDED